What’s Your Diagnosis? Identification and Management of Marine Envenomations in Pediatric Patients

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

Case Presentation: Identification and Management of Marine Envenomation in Pediatric Patients

A 4-year-old girl with the chief complaint of rash is brought to the ED. Her family is on a beach vacation to the Florida coast for the summer. After exiting the ocean today, she complained of a ?stinging? feeling on her chest and abdomen. Later in the afternoon, while changing her clothes, her father noticed a rash and brought her to the ED.

The girl complains that the rash is ?very itchy.? On examination, you note an erythematous papular rash on her abdomen, chest, and buttocks, sparing the extremities, upper back, and face.

Her vital signs are all within normal range, and she is well appearing, scratching occasionally at her rash.

What is the best way to work up this patient? What treatment is needed? What is the expected clinical course of this condition?

Case Conclusion

Given the pattern of lesions on the trunk of the 4-year-old girl and the environmental exposure history provided by her father, the patient was diagnosed with seabather?s eruption. She was treated with oral diphenhydramine for symptoms of itching, and the father was instructed to wash and dry her bathing clothing. Within the week, her rash resolved, and she had no additional complications.

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Last Updated on July 9, 2020

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