What’s Your Diagnosis? Pediatric Spinal Epidural Abscess in the ED

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge! But before we begin, check to see if you got last month’s case on Ultrasound-Guided Pediatric Nerve Blocks in the Emergency Department: An Evidence-Based Update right.

Case Presentation: Pediatric Spinal Epidural Abscess: Recognition and Management in the Emergency Department  

A 30-month-old girl presents by referral from her primary care physician for fever and refusal to walk…

The parents tell you there is no history of trauma. You note the girl is febrile, tachycardic, and crying. Upon examination, her right hip and knee are in flexion, and she cries when you attempt to extend her knee. You cannot identify an area of focal tenderness to palpation. When the patient is prompted to bear weight on her right lower extremity, she touches her toes to the floor but refuses to bear weight. What is the differential diagnosis? What laboratory and radiographic studies would be helpful in making the diagnosis? 

Make your best guess, and check back next month to find out the correct answer!

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One thought on “What’s Your Diagnosis? Pediatric Spinal Epidural Abscess in the ED

  1. right hip septic joint based on the case presentation but unsure now as this is titled Pediatric Spinal Epidural Abscess: Recognition and Management in the Emergency Department

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