Test Your Knowledge: High-Flow Nasal Cannula and Noninvasive Ventilation in Pediatric Emergency Medicine

The use of high-flow nasal cannula and noninvasive ventilation has become increasingly common in emergency medicine as a first-line treatment of pediatric patients with respiratory distress secondary to asthma and bronchiolitis. When implemented in clinical practice, close monitoring of vital signs and ventilation parameters is warranted to identify possible signs of respiratory failure.

Our recent issue High-Flow Nasal Cannula and Noninvasive Ventilation in Pediatric Emergency Medicine provides evidence-based recommendations for the appropriate use of noninvasive ventilation modalities in pediatric patients including high- flow nasal cannula, continuous positive airway pressure, and bilevel positive airway pressure in the setting of acute respiratory distress.

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Ready to learn more? Log in or subscribe now to check out our recent issue High-Flow Nasal Cannula and Noninvasive Ventilation in Pediatric Emergency Medicine. Complete the 10-question quiz to earn 4 CME credits!

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Here are a few key points:

  • The mechanisms by which HFNC, CPAP, and BPAP provide respiratory support
  • The different types of interfaces that can be used for HFNC, CPAP, and BPAP
  • The indications for using HNFC and NIV in the emergency department, as well as contraindications to their use and complications that can result from their use
  • The benefits of using HNFC and NIV in the management of specific conditions, such as bronchiolitis and asthma
  • Clinical predictors and indicators of failure of HFNC and NIV

Read the full issue and earn 4 CME credits!

Last Updated on December 13, 2021

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